Football Conditioning Drills

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Football Conditioning Drills
Football Conditioning Drills

 

Football Conditioning Drills

  The brutal hardship of enduring the pain and glory that coincide with football season begins mid-summer during bouts of conditioning. Football is arguably the most explosive sport known to mankind. The average play lasts roughly five seconds, but a lot can happen in a short period of time. Football is a vigorous chess match that forces players on opposite sides of the ball to directly lineup against their counterparts. The athlete that wins his individual battle on the field typically demonstrates a higher level of strength and stamina, which are products of dedicated conditioning.
Football conditioning drills greatly differ from conventional aerobic training efforts. Players must be able to cut up field, hold their blocks, suddenly change direction and sustain big hits. Spending hot summer afternoons running wind sprints on the track simply doesn’t prepare athletes for the tenacity of in-game situations. The brutality of a football game cannot be simulated during conditioning drills, but it’s important for players to prepare for the initial hurt that occurs when returning to the field. Developing the ability to dominate the opposition begins with a mindset, which is tested during conditioning drills.
Sprint ladders develop agility, coordination, muscle strength and vertical speed, which makes them an integral segment of a full football conditioning program. A “ladder” is performed in segments of yardage, followed by an interval rest period:

  • 2 x sprint 10 yards, rest 10-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 20 yards, rest 20-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 30 yards, rest 30-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 40 yards, rest 30-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 50 yards, rest 30-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 40 yards, rest 30-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 30 yards, rest 30-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 20 yards, rest 20-second rest interval
  • 2 x sprint 10 yards, rest 10-second rest interval

 

Football Conditioning Drills

Developing a high level of endurance is an absolute must for football players during mid-summer conditioning. Sprint interval training is an efficient method of helping players become accustomed to the start-and-stop aspect of in-game situations. Interval training requires players to alternate between sprinting and jogging. A rest period of 30 seconds should follow each interval:

  1. 20-yard sprint
    • 20-yard stride
    1. 20-yard sprint
    • 20-yard stride
    1. 20-yard sprint

Using the entire length of the field is an effective method of forcing players to expend maximum energy in drills that require repetitive movement. A tempo run is a good example of this. Each run begins at the corner of an end zone. Players must run in stride for the length of the field while taking longer strides than they’re accustomed to. After reaching the goal line, players must jog to the opposite side of the end zone, and then turn to jog toward their original starting point. This exercise should be repeated at least four times, while allowing 60 seconds of rest in between runs. Training volume should increase as offseason conditioning efforts progress

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Football Conditioning Drills 

 

 

 

 

 

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